Fluticasone superior to zafirlukast for persistent asthma

המידע באדיבות medicontext.co.il
Last Updated: 2001-08-06 16:13:06 EDT (Reuters Health)

WESTPORT, CT (Reuters Health) – The inhaled corticosteroid, fluticasone, appears to be more effective than the leukotriene modifier, zafirlukast, in patients whose asthma is not controlled by short-acting beta-2-agonists, according to the results of a randomized trial.

Dr. William W. Busse, from the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, and colleagues randomly assigned 338 asthma patients, 12 to 75 years of age, taking beta-2-agonists at baseline, to daily treatment with inhaled fluticasone, oral zafirlukast or placebo.

After 12 weeks of treatment, pulmonary function was significantly improved in the patients receiving fluticasone compared with those receiving zafirlukast or placebo, according the report in the July issue of The Journal of Family Practice.

For patients receiving fluticasone, mean improvement in FEV1 and morning and evening peak expiratory flow was significantly greater than among those receiving zafirlukast or placebo (p < 0.05).

In addition, mean symptom scores, percentage of symptom-free and albuterol-free days, albuterol use, and nighttime awakenings from asthma, were significantly improved among patients receiving fluticasone compared with those taking zafirlukast or placebo (p equal to or less than 0.006), the researchers report.

Dr. Busse's group also found that more patients taking fluticasone reported being "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their medication than were patients taking zafirlukast or placebo.

"These data are consistent with asthma guidelines, which recommend inhaled corticosteroids as first-line treatment for all levels of persistent asthma," Dr. Busse and colleagues conclude.

J Fam Pract 2001;50:595-602.

-Westport Newsroom 203 319 2700

Fluticasone superior to zafirlukast for persistent asthma

Last Updated: 2001-08-06 16:13:06 EDT (Reuters Health)

WESTPORT, CT (Reuters Health) – The inhaled corticosteroid, fluticasone, appears to be more effective than the leukotriene modifier, zafirlukast, in patients whose asthma is not controlled by short-acting beta-2-agonists, according to the results of a randomized trial.

Dr. William W. Busse, from the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, and colleagues randomly assigned 338 asthma patients, 12 to 75 years of age, taking beta-2-agonists at baseline, to daily treatment with inhaled fluticasone, oral zafirlukast or placebo.

After 12 weeks of treatment, pulmonary function was significantly improved in the patients receiving fluticasone compared with those receiving zafirlukast or placebo, according the report in the July issue of The Journal of Family Practice.

For patients receiving fluticasone, mean improvement in FEV1 and morning and evening peak expiratory flow was significantly greater than among those receiving zafirlukast or placebo (p < 0.05).

In addition, mean symptom scores, percentage of symptom-free and albuterol-free days, albuterol use, and nighttime awakenings from asthma, were significantly improved among patients receiving fluticasone compared with those taking zafirlukast or placebo (p equal to or less than 0.006), the researchers report.

Dr. Busse's group also found that more patients taking fluticasone reported being "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their medication than were patients taking zafirlukast or placebo.

"These data are consistent with asthma guidelines, which recommend inhaled corticosteroids as first-line treatment for all levels of persistent asthma," Dr. Busse and colleagues conclude.

J Fam Pract 2001;50:595-602.

-Westport Newsroom 203 319 2700

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